“He is hard to fool and to catch”

On May 21, 1863, Lieutenant Lemuel Keith, Company G, 61st Regiment North Carolina Troops, was put in charge of a detail to find and arrest Lieutenant John McAllister. McAllister, 51st North Carolina, Company A, was absent without leave after overstaying his sick furlough. Keith and his detail searched near McAllister’s home at Hilton in New… Continue reading “He is hard to fool and to catch”

Rounding Up Deserters in Robeson County

In early February 1863, a Mr. Swann of Lumberton wrote a letter to General Whiting in Wilmington requesting military assistance in Robeson County. Bands of deserters, hiding in the swamps, were terrorizing the county’s citizens. Local militia seemed unable to protect the residents or their property. Whiting ordered General Clingman to send an armed force… Continue reading Rounding Up Deserters in Robeson County

Snapshot: Condition of the 51st North Carolina on August 31, 1863

The Inspection On August 31, 1863, the 51st North Carolina was camped on Sullivan’s Island near Charleston. Captain W. Gordon McCabe performed a “muster inspection” of the regiment on that date. His inspection measured the Fifty-First’s readiness as a combat unit. Staff Officers On the day of McCabe’s inspection, Colonel McKethan and Lieutenant-Colonel Hobson were… Continue reading Snapshot: Condition of the 51st North Carolina on August 31, 1863

Guarding the Wappoo: Lt. Watson Gets in Hot Water

The Wappo Cut is a waterway southwest of Charleston that connects the Ashley and Stono rivers. During the Civil War, traffic between James Island and Charleston had to cross the Cut. Two bridges spanned the waterway: the New Bridge and a pontoon bridge. During April 1863, the 51st North Carolina was tasked with guarding the… Continue reading Guarding the Wappoo: Lt. Watson Gets in Hot Water

What’s for Dinner? Feeding a Regiment

In late June 1862, the 51st North Carolina moved to Fort Johnston, near Southport. Conditions at the fort were much better than those at the camps the regiment had previously occupied. The men were housed in barracks. They had a ready supply of good drinking water. All the regiment needed to do was feed the… Continue reading What’s for Dinner? Feeding a Regiment

Chaos in Command, Part 3: The New Field Officers

In an earlier post, “Feuding in the Officers’ Ranks,” I described the squabbling among the Fifty-First’s officers that left the regiment with only one field officer for almost four months. In this three-part series I add further details gleaned from documents contained in the NARA compiled service records of some of the officers involved during… Continue reading Chaos in Command, Part 3: The New Field Officers

Chaos in Command, Part 2: Lt. Col. Allen Resigns

In an earlier post, “Feuding in the Officers’ Ranks,” I described the squabbling among the Fifty-First’s officers that left the regiment with only one field officer for almost four months. In this three-part series I add further details gleaned from documents contained in the NARA compiled service records of some of the officers involved during… Continue reading Chaos in Command, Part 2: Lt. Col. Allen Resigns

Chaos in Command, Part 1: Colonel Cantwell Resigns

In an earlier post, “Feuding in the Officers’ Ranks,” I described the squabbling among the Fifty-First’s officers that left the regiment with only one field officer for almost four months. In this three-part series I add further details gleaned from documents contained in the NARA compiled service records of some of the officers involved during… Continue reading Chaos in Command, Part 1: Colonel Cantwell Resigns

Petition to Assign Reverend Colin Shaw as the Fifty-First’s Chaplain

On June 2, 1862, shortly after the 51st North Carolina organized, Reverend H. C. Brooks was appointed chaplain of the regiment. Brooks immediately fell ill. In fact, he might not have ever reported for duty. Listed as absent in every month of his assignment, Brooks finally resigned sometime before September 1, 1862. The Fifty-First was… Continue reading Petition to Assign Reverend Colin Shaw as the Fifty-First’s Chaplain

New Information from Anchram Evans’ Letters

(Updated 3/15/2023) The Letters Anchram Harris Evans served in Company G, 51st Regiment North Carolina Troops during the War Between the States. He enlisted as a sergeant in January 1862 and served with the regiment until the end of the war. Anchram and his wife, Elizabeth, wrote to each other once or twice a week… Continue reading New Information from Anchram Evans’ Letters